skip navigation
Lou Lubin

Lou Lubin

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Recent DVDs

The Bowery Boys: Volume Two ... Slip (Leo Gorcey), Sach (Huntz Hall) and the rest of the gang return for a... more info $39.96was $47.99 Buy Now

Fall Guy ... Tom Cochrane has no memory of the murder. What he remembers is a party, a few... more info $16.95was $17.99 Buy Now

WB Horror / Mystery Double... A 3-Disc 6-Movie Collection of Horror Mysteries. It's an eclectic mix of stars... more info $23.95was $29.99 Buy Now

Betrayed ... In this chilling iconic film noir Robert Mitchum plays a new bride's (Kim... more info $15.95was $17.99 Buy Now

Johnny Eager ... The city prosecutor's daughter knows Johnny is bad news - and oh how she'd love... more info $15.96was $19.99 Buy Now

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Best known as the creator of the sitcom "Mister Ed," Arthur Lubin grew up near the hub of the burgeoning film medium. He first broke into the industry as an actor in silent films in 1924. He appeared in films over the next five years before making the leap to director in 1934 with "A Successful Failure." Then, he created his own film and music studio, Lubin Studios, and steadily built his reputation as a director. By the '40s, he was directing a number of Abbott and Costello comedy movies including, "Buck Privates," "In the Navy," and "Hold That Ghost." In 1943, he directed his biggest box office success, the horror classic, "Phantom of the Opera." In the '50s, Lubin directed a number of films featuring "Francis the Talking Mule." He brought the concept to television in 1958 with the show about a talking horse named "Mister Ed." After the series' successful eight-year run, Lubin continued working in television until he retired in 1981. He lived out the rest of his days with his life partner, Frank Burford. Lubin died age 96.

Best known as the creator of the sitcom "Mister Ed," Arthur Lubin grew up near the hub of the burgeoning film medium. He first broke into the industry as an actor in silent films in 1924. He appeared in films over the next five years before making the leap to director in 1934 with "A Successful Failure." Then, he created his own film and music studio, Lubin Studios, and steadily built his reputation as a director. By the '40s, he was directing a number of Abbott and Costello comedy movies including, "Buck Privates," "In the Navy," and "Hold That Ghost." In 1943, he directed his biggest box office success, the horror classic, "Phantom of the Opera." In the '50s, Lubin directed a number of films featuring "Francis the Talking Mule." He brought the concept to television in 1958 with the show about a talking horse named "Mister Ed." After the series' successful eight-year run, Lubin continued working in television until he retired in 1981. He lived out the rest of his days with his life partner, Frank Burford. Lubin died age 96.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 I Married a Woman (1958) Tailor
2.
 It's Always Fair Weather (1955) Lefty
3.
 Money from Home (1954) Sam
4.
 Private Eyes (1953) Oskar
5.
 The Clown (1953) Little Julie
6.
 Pat and Mike (1952) Waiter
7.
 Tropical Heat Wave (1952) Frost
8.
 Outlaw Women (1952)
9.
 Models Inc. (1952) Max
10.
 Just Across the Street (1952) Man in trouble
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute