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Sam McDaniel

Sam McDaniel

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Also Known As: Sam Mcdaniels, Deacon Mcdaniel, "Deacon" Mcdaniels, Samuel R. Mcdaniel, Sam "Deacon" Mcdaniel Died:
Born: Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession:

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Handsome, long-faced African-American performer of film, TV and stage who received his break when he assumed the role of C.J. in the hit Off-Broadway production of "A Soldier's Play." His significant association with TV producer-writer Steven Bochco began with an appearance as a militant cop in an episode of "Hill Street Blues." McDaniel has subsequently starred in two Bochco police series: the short-lived musical program, "Cop Rock" (ABC, 1990) and the controversial drama, "NYPD Blue" (ABC, from 1993 to 2001). In the latter, he was Lieutenant Arthur Fancy, sort of a black variation of Daniel J. Travanti's "anchor" role on "Hill Street Blues."McDaniel's impressive theater credits have included the Broadway productions of John Guare's "Six Degrees of Separation" (in the starring role he originated Off-Broadway), "Someone Who'll Watch Over Me," as a political prisoner opposite Stephen Rea, and August Wilson's "Joe Turner's Come and Gone." He also acted in John Malkovich's Off-Broadway production of Lanford Wilson's "Balm in Gilead." McDaniel has appeared in several features, including "Alice" (1990), "Strictly Business" (1991) and "Malcolm X" (1992).

Handsome, long-faced African-American performer of film, TV and stage who received his break when he assumed the role of C.J. in the hit Off-Broadway production of "A Soldier's Play." His significant association with TV producer-writer Steven Bochco began with an appearance as a militant cop in an episode of "Hill Street Blues." McDaniel has subsequently starred in two Bochco police series: the short-lived musical program, "Cop Rock" (ABC, 1990) and the controversial drama, "NYPD Blue" (ABC, from 1993 to 2001). In the latter, he was Lieutenant Arthur Fancy, sort of a black variation of Daniel J. Travanti's "anchor" role on "Hill Street Blues."

McDaniel's impressive theater credits have included the Broadway productions of John Guare's "Six Degrees of Separation" (in the starring role he originated Off-Broadway), "Someone Who'll Watch Over Me," as a political prisoner opposite Stephen Rea, and August Wilson's "Joe Turner's Come and Gone." He also acted in John Malkovich's Off-Broadway production of Lanford Wilson's "Balm in Gilead." McDaniel has appeared in several features, including "Alice" (1990), "Strictly Business" (1991) and "Malcolm X" (1992).

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Ice Palace (1960) Porter
3.
 Party Girl (1958) Jesse
4.
 St. Louis Blues (1958) Drunk
5.
 A Man Called Peter (1955) Maitre d'
7.
8.
 Affair with a Stranger (1953) Porter
9.
 A Lion Is in the Streets (1953) Castleberry's butler
10.
 The President's Lady (1953) Henry, Phariss' driver
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Contributions

CharlesDurham ( 2007-02-09 )

Source: The Internet Movie Database. http://us.imdb.com

Sam McDaniel was born on January 28, 1886 in Wichita, Kansas. He is the brother of the late actresses Hattie and Etta McDaniel. Sam's first films were in 1929 when he appeared in "Brown Gravy" and "Hallelujah", where he was uncredited for his roles. Sam appeared in more than 200 films and unfortunately, he was not given proper credit in many of them. Sam McDaniel's last two films were in 1960 when he appeared in "Ice Palace", which he uncredited as a porter and "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn", which he also was not given credit as a servant. Sam McDaniel died on September 24, 1962 of throat cancer in Los Angeles, California.

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