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Overview for Jason Robards Jr.
Jason Robards Jr.

Jason Robards Jr.

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MILESTONES

1995:
Acted in Pinter's "Moonlight" at NYC's Roundabout Theater's new Laura Pels Theater in NYC
1991:
Again played Abraham Lincoln in the ABC TV-movie "The Perfect Tribute"
1947:
Broadway debut in "The Mikado"
:
Made earliest TV appearances on such dramatic anothology programs as "Windows" (CBS, 1955), "Star Tonight" (ABC, 1955-1956) and "Playhouse 90" (CBS, 1956-1961)
1958:
Performed together onstage with his father for almost a year in Budd Schulberg's "The Disenchanted", which earned him his only Tony (Best Actor in a Drama) to date for his role as Manley Halliday (a thinly disguised F Scott Fitzgerald)
1957:
Played Jamie Tyrone in the original Broadway production of O'Neill's "Long Day's Journey Into Night"
1998:
Played Mr. Bodwin in Demme's "Beloved", starring Oprah Winfrey
1997:
Played the Lear-like patriarch in "A Thousand Acres"
1999:
Portrayed the dying patriarch Earl Partridge in Paul Thomas Anderson's "Magnolia"
:
Provided narration for "TR, the Story of Theadore Roosevelt" (PBS, 1996), "Truman" (PBS, 1997) and "U.S.S. Indianapolis: Tragedy at Sea" (Discovery Channel, 1998)
1939:
Served as a radioman with the US Navy; stationed at Pearl Harbor at the time of the Japanese attack that precipitated American involvement in WWII
1947:
Stage acting debut in "Out of the Frying Pan", Rehoboth Beach, Delaware
1988:
Acted a third time (again as the senior Tyrone) in stage production of "Long Day's Journey Into Night", this time a Broadway revival directed by Quintero; done in repertory with O'Neill's lone comedy, "Ah, Wilderness!", in which he played Nat Miller; acted with Dewhurst and her son Campbell Scott in both productions
1988:
Copped an Emmy as Henry Drummond in the NBC presentation of "Inherit the Wind"
1975:
Earned second Emmy nomination for the "ABC Theatre" presentation of "A Moon for the Misbegotten"
1964:
First played Abraham Lincoln in a TV adaptation of Robert Sherwood's play "Abe Lincoln in Illinois"; received first Emmy nomination
1977:
First TV miniseries, "Washington: Behind Closed Doors" (ABC), earned another Emmy nomination for his portrayal of Richard Monckton (a thinly-disguised Richard Nixon)
1996:
Last stage role to date in Brial Friel's "Molly Sweeney" with Alfred Molina (also for the Roundabout)
1988:
Only movie to date with son Sam, "Bright Lights, Big City"
1980:
Oscar-nominated for his supporting turn as reclusive billionaire Howard Hughes in "Melvin and Howard"; first collaboration with director Jonathan Demme
1983:
Portrayed Grandpa Martin Vanderhof in Broadway revival of "You Can't Take It with You"; acted with Dewhurst during course of its run
1951:
Served as assistant stage manager at NYC's 48th Street Theatre
1977:
Snagged second Best Supporting Actor Oscar as Dashiell Hammett in "Julia", based on Hellman's memoir "Pentimento"
1962:
Starred as Murray Burns in Broadway production of "A Thousand Clowns"
1952:
Was assistant stage managr at NYC's Playhouse Theatre
1975:
Acted a second time in "Long Day's Journey Into Night", this time in the role of the father, James Tyrone, in a production staged first at Washington DC's Eisenhower Theatre and the following year at the Brooklyn Academy of Music; also directed production
1977:
Acted in Broadway production of O'Neill's "A Touch of the Poet", directed by Quintero
1960:
Acted on Broadway in Lillian Hellman's "Toys in the Atttic", garnering a Tony nomination
:
Born in Chicago when his father was on the road in a play called "Lightnin'" (as the juvenile lead); grew up in NYC but was often on the road with his parents
1976:
Earned first Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his portrayal of <i>Washington Post</i> editor Ben Bradlee in "All the President's Men"
1963:
Essayed the role of playwright George S. Kaufman in "Act One", a film adaptation of Moss Hart's autobiography
1989:
First collaboration with director Ron Howard, playing the father of grown children (Steve Martin, Dianne Wiest, Harley Kozak and Tom Hulce) in "Parenthood"
1983:
Played an American doctor fighting to survive in the aftermath of nuclear war in ABC's "The Day After"
1993:
Played cold-hearted head of a law firm that dismisses a young colleague (Tom Hanks) with AIDS in Demme's "Philadelphia"
1973:
Played James Tyrone Jr opposite Colleen Dewhurst's Josie Hogan in Broadway production of O'Neill's "A Moon for the Misbegotten" (directed by Quintero); stopped drinking for good during its run (a process which he had begun soon after his near-death in the wreck), though he admitted to <i>The New York Times</i> (February 9, 1994): "Of course, every once in a while I'll take a glass of wine"
1973:
Reteamed with Peckinpah for "Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid", playing Governor Lew Wallace (the author of "Ben Hur")
1994:
Reteamed with Ron Howard for "The Paper"
1983:
Starred in the title role of "Max Dugan Returns", scripted by Neil Simon
2000:
Starred opposite Sherry Stringfield as an elderly father who can no longer take care of himself in the CBS movie "Going Home"
1984:
Acclaimed for his portrayal of Soviet dissident Andrei Sakharov in HBO's "Sakharov"
1968:
Acted on Broadway in Joseph Heller's "We Bombed in New Haven", which bombed in New York
1959:
Acted the part of Dr. Rank in an NBC "Hallmark Hall of Fame" presentation of Henrik Ibsen's "A Doll's House"; Julie Harris portrayed Nora and Christopher Plummer was Torvald
1951:
Appeared in Broadway production of "Stalag 17" at 48th Street Theatre
1959:
Film acting debut as a Hungarian freedom fighter in Anatole Litvak's "The Journey"
1991:
Hosted and narrated the 13-part PBS documentary series "On the Waterways"
:
Landed in Hollywood at the age of five
1976:
Made last of four TV-movies about the Mills family, "Addie and the King of Hearts"
1956:
Performed in acclaimed Circle in the Square production of Eugene O'Neill's "The Iceman Cometh", directed by Jose Quintero, in which the audience was so close a patron once reached over and touched Robards' cheek; his OBIE-winning protrayal of Hickey revitalized his career, and the success of the production convinced the playwright's widow Carlotta to allow Quintero to stage "Long Day's Journey Into Night"
1972:
Played role of James Mills in "The House Without a Christmas Tree", the first of four CBS nearly annual TV-movies exploring the lives of a Nebraska family in the 1940s
:
Portrayed Erie Smith in O'Neill's "Hughie" (directed by Quintero) on Broadway and later on tour
1991:
Portrayed Mark Twain (Samuel Langhorne Clemens) in "Mark Twain & Me" (The Disney Channel), a TV-movie based on the author's friendship with 11-year-old Dorothy Quick, as chronicled in her autobiographical account, "Enchantment"
1993:
Portrayed the grandfather in The Disney Channel miniseries remake of "Heidi"
1990:
Provided the voice of Ulysses S. Grant in Ken Burns' acclaimed PBS documentary "The Civil War"; had previously played Grant in the little-seen "The Legend of the Lone Ranger" (1981)
1980:
Received an Emmy nomination for his title portrayal in NBC's "F.D.R -- The Final Years"; also garnered praise as agent and producer Leland Hayward in CBS' "Haywire"
1970:
Received credit as song performer in Sam Peckinpah's "The Ballad of Cable Hogue", singing "Butterfly Mornin's"; also starred in title role
1985:
Reprised his role as Hickey in Broadway production of "The Iceman Cometh", directed by Quintero
1962:
Reprised his role as Jamie Tyrone in Sidney Lumet's film version of "Long Day's Journey Into Night" and starred opposite Jennifer Jones in "Tender Is the Night", based on F Scott Fitzgerald's novel
1965:
Reprised Murray Burns character and received top billing in a feature film for the first time in "A Thousand Clowns"
1959:
Starred as "Macbeth" in a Quintero-directed production in Cambridge, Massachusettes
1994:
Starred on Broadway with Christopher Plummer as two elderly British poets in revival of Harold Pinter's "No Man's Land"
1972:
Was in a car crash on a California highway in the mountains; had no heartbeat when he arrived at the nearest hospital

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