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Arguably one of the biggest names in feature-length animation since Walt Disney, animator and producer Don Bluth learned his craft at the Disney Studio, before turning into a direct competitor after branching out on his own in 1979. While with Disney, Bluth worked as an assistant animator on "Sleeping Beauty" (1958), only to leave for college and to work as a Mormon missionary. He returned in 1971 and was the animator on "Robin Hood" (1973), "The Rescuers" (1977) and "Pete's Dragon" (1977). But he felt that Disney had lost its way through its cost-cutting measures and decided to form his own company with animator Gary Goldman called Don Bluth Productions. Bluth earned immediate buzz for the 30-minute short, "Banjo, the Woodpile Cat," which led to being hired to animate a musical sequence in "Xanadu" (1980). After the mild success of "The Secret of NIMH" (1982), Bluth entered the video game design business, only to see his company declare bankruptcy in 1984. He reformed the studio with fresh investment money and forged ahead with Sullivan Bluth Studios, relocating to Ireland and making "An American Tail" (1986) and "The Land Before Time" (1988) under Steven Spielberg's Amblin Entertainment. In 1992,...

Arguably one of the biggest names in feature-length animation since Walt Disney, animator and producer Don Bluth learned his craft at the Disney Studio, before turning into a direct competitor after branching out on his own in 1979. While with Disney, Bluth worked as an assistant animator on "Sleeping Beauty" (1958), only to leave for college and to work as a Mormon missionary. He returned in 1971 and was the animator on "Robin Hood" (1973), "The Rescuers" (1977) and "Pete's Dragon" (1977). But he felt that Disney had lost its way through its cost-cutting measures and decided to form his own company with animator Gary Goldman called Don Bluth Productions. Bluth earned immediate buzz for the 30-minute short, "Banjo, the Woodpile Cat," which led to being hired to animate a musical sequence in "Xanadu" (1980). After the mild success of "The Secret of NIMH" (1982), Bluth entered the video game design business, only to see his company declare bankruptcy in 1984. He reformed the studio with fresh investment money and forged ahead with Sullivan Bluth Studios, relocating to Ireland and making "An American Tail" (1986) and "The Land Before Time" (1988) under Steven Spielberg's Amblin Entertainment. In 1992, that company failed and led Bluth to partner with Fox Animation Studios, making "Anastasia" (1997) and "Titan A.E." (2000), the latter of which forced Fox to shutter its doors. Despite his business track record, Bluth was nonetheless noted for quality hand-drawn animation that was once the standard for rival Disney.

Born on Sept. 13, 1937 in El Paso, TX, Bluth was raised with six other siblings by his father, Virgil, and his mother, Emaline. He moved with his family to Payson, UT when he was six years old, later settling in Southern California as a teenager. After graduating high school in 1955, he spent 18 months at Disney as an assistant animator, working under veteran animator John Lounsbery on "Sleeping Beauty" (1958). He left to fulfill his Mormon mission in Argentina and to later earn a degree in English literature from Brigham Young University. Upon his return to Los Angeles, he became a layout artist for Filmation Studios, working on Saturday morning cartoons like "Fantastic Voyage" (ABC, 1968-69). Bluth returned to Disney in 1971, where he was joined the following year by animator and future partner, Gary Goldman, then fresh out of college. His first feature as an animator was "Robin Hood" (1973), and graduated to director of animation on "The Rescuers" (1977) and "Pete's Dragon" (1977). A devotee of the classical Disney style of animation, Bluth became dissatisfied with the cost-cutting measures the studio had taken, which cheapened the animation's look, and decided to branch out on his own.

Along with Goldman and animator John Pomeroy - not to mention about a dozen other animators - Bluth left Disney to form his own company, Don Bluth Productions, which started in a garage in Culver City. Bluth, Goldman and Pomeroy had already been working on their own animation project and once on their own, they put themselves on a crash course to finish it, resulting in the 30-minute short, "Banjo, the Woodpile Cat," which eventually aired on ABC in 1982. Prior to that, however, they won critical praise round Hollywood, as the animated film served as a résumé that landed them an assignment to animate a two-minute musical sequence for the feature "Xanadu" (1980). With the nicely textured "The Secret of NIMH" (1982), based on the Newberry Award-winning children's book Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of N*I*M*H, Don Bluth Productions showed its work could compete with Disney, only to see the picture disappear quickly from theaters despite rave reviews. After a second film project dissolved during the 1982 animators' strike, the Bluth team jumped at the chance to animate interactive video arcade games for the San Diego-based Cinematronics company.

Bluth and his people designed the groundbreaking video games "Dragon's Lair" and "Space Age" before the bottom fell out of the arcade market and stopped their cash. Though Don Bluth Productions would go bankrupt in 1984, a semi-retired mergers and acquisitions broker named Morris Sullivan entered the picture as their guardian angel, providing the sorely-needed business savvy to keep the newly formed Sullivan Bluth Studios solvent. Sullivan would be the impetus behind their move to Ireland to take advantage of that country's lower production costs and government incentives for the arts. Impressed with "The Secret of NIMH," Steven Spielberg also came to Bluth with the idea that became "An American Tail" (1986), a cute story about a Russian mouse named Fievel, who becomes separated from his family and winds up having adventures in America while trying to find them. But after the success of "An American Tail" and "The Land Before Time" (1988), both released through Universal Pictures, Sullivan Bluth severed its connections with Spielberg's Amblin Entertainment, passing on the opportunity to do the animation for "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" (1988), which would have put them back on the Disney payroll.

The next two features from Sullivan Bluth, "All Dogs Go to Heaven" (1989) and "Rock-a-Doodle" (1991), were not successes and Bluth's company again was forced to declare bankruptcy. Sullivan Bluth eventually became the property of Rupert Murdoch, and the animation head's sixth feature - and first one sharing directorial credit with Goldman - "Hans Christian Andersen's Thumbelina" (1994) came out under Warner Bros' Family Entertainment banner. "The Pebble and the Penguin" (1995) was Bluth's last gasp from Ireland, but the 1994 deal that he and Goldman signed with 20th Century Fox promised deeper pockets and another opportunity to go toe-to-toe with Disney. Grafting warm and family-friendly motifs onto turbulent aspects of modern history and mythology, Bluth-Goldman brought forth the anxiously-awaited debut offering from Fox Animation, "Anastasia" (1997). Though certainly a cut below the best of Disney, it grossed more than either "An American Tail" or "The Land Before Time," establishing a substantial beachhead for further attacks on the behemoth.

Basically an animation traditionalist to this point, Bluth had favored old-fashioned children's stories, naturalistic character movement, and uplifting values. Rather than concocting new recipes for success, his movies offered solid animation with thriftier techniques, and were often hampered by weaker characters, storytelling and songs. Fox Animation's next move was a cautious one, releasing "Bartok the Magnificent" (1999) straight-to-video. Moving away from traditional fare, Bluth and Goldman picked up where they had left off with their innovative video game "Space Age," embracing cutting-edge sci-fi animation for "Titan A.E." (2000). This meant a departure from their more traditional work as 65 percent of the movie was CGI. But all the hard work failed to pay off, as "Titan" was such a colossal financial disaster that it forced Fox Animation to shut its doors for nearly a decade. Feeling the sting of failure, Bluth and Goldman returned to making video games like "Dragon's Lair 3D: Return to the Lair" (2002) and "I-Ninja" (2003), while doing the animation for the music video "Mary" (2004), by the Scissor Sisters. In 2010, Bluth and Goldman formed the video game development company, Square One Studios, and forged a distribution pact with Warner Bros. Digital. As of 2011, Bluth had no plans to return to animated features.

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