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Robert Wilke

Robert Wilke

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Also Known As: Bob Wilke, Robert J. Wilke Died:
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Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

An attractive, petite character actress, Wilhoite has worked extensively in theater, film and TV. Known for her portrayals of strong, sassy women, she made her feature debut in the teen-sex comedy "Private School" (1983) and that same year ventured into TV-movies with "Quarterback Princess" (CBS). In addition to supporting Charles Bronson in J Lee Thompson's "Murphy's Law" (1986), she wrote and sang the title song. Wilhoit marked time in small roles in generally forgettable films (Sandra Locke's "Ratboy" 1986; Alan Parker's "Angel Heart" 1987) before landing parts like a college newspaper editor in "Campus Man" (also 1987) and reporter Hank O'Hare in "Brenda Starr" (1989). Other credits include "Lorenzo's Oil" (1992), "Fire in the Sky" (1993) and "Color of Night" (1994).Television has provided Wilhoite with some of her best roles. She has made guest appearances on such shows as "Cagney and Lacey" and "Cop Rock," in which she had a recurring role as a drug-addicted mother. Her TV-movies include "Single Bars, Single Women" (ABC, 1984), "Not My Kid" (CBS, 1985) and "Broken Promises: Taking Emily Back" (CBS, 1993). Wilhoite was chosen by cartoonist Cathy Guisewite to provide the voice of "Cathy" in...

An attractive, petite character actress, Wilhoite has worked extensively in theater, film and TV. Known for her portrayals of strong, sassy women, she made her feature debut in the teen-sex comedy "Private School" (1983) and that same year ventured into TV-movies with "Quarterback Princess" (CBS). In addition to supporting Charles Bronson in J Lee Thompson's "Murphy's Law" (1986), she wrote and sang the title song. Wilhoit marked time in small roles in generally forgettable films (Sandra Locke's "Ratboy" 1986; Alan Parker's "Angel Heart" 1987) before landing parts like a college newspaper editor in "Campus Man" (also 1987) and reporter Hank O'Hare in "Brenda Starr" (1989). Other credits include "Lorenzo's Oil" (1992), "Fire in the Sky" (1993) and "Color of Night" (1994).

Television has provided Wilhoite with some of her best roles. She has made guest appearances on such shows as "Cagney and Lacey" and "Cop Rock," in which she had a recurring role as a drug-addicted mother. Her TV-movies include "Single Bars, Single Women" (ABC, 1984), "Not My Kid" (CBS, 1985) and "Broken Promises: Taking Emily Back" (CBS, 1993). Wilhoite was chosen by cartoonist Cathy Guisewite to provide the voice of "Cathy" in several animated specials based on the popular comic strip. She has also portrayed the mentally challenged girlfriend of Larry Drake on the NBC legal drama "L.A. Law" (NBC, 1993-94) and is remembered as the child-like Chloe, whose pregnancy and childbirth caused difficulties for her doctor sister (Sherry Stringfield) on "ER."

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Stripes (1981) General Barnicke
2.
 Sweet Creek County War, The (1978) Lucas K Derring
3.
 Days of Heaven (1978) Farm Foreman
4.
 Santee (1973) Actor
5.
 Boy Who Cried Werewolf, The (1973) Sheriff
6.
 The Resurrection of Zachary Wheeler (1971) Hugh Fielding
7.
 A Gunfight (1971) Tom Cater
8.
 The Cheyenne Social Club (1970) Corey Bannister
9.
 Tony Rome (1967) Ralph Turpin
10.
 Smoky (1966) Jeff
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Contributions

albatros1 ( 2007-11-20 )

Source: not available

Robert J. Wilke (born 18 May 1914 in Cincinnati, Ohio; died 28 March 1989 in Los Angeles) was a prolific American film actor noted primarily for his villainous roles, mainly in westerns. Wilke started as a stuntman in the 1930s and his first appearance on screen was in "San Francisco" (1936). He soon began to acquire regular character parts, mainly as a heavy, and made his mark when, along with Lee Van Cleef and Sheb Wooley, he played one of the "three men waiting at the station" in High Noon (1952). He appeared in many of the best known TV series, mainly westerns, several times in some of them: "Maverick", "Bonanza", "Gunsmoke","Wagon Train", "Rawhide", "Have Gun - Will Travel", "Bronco","Cheyenne", "Lawman", "Wanted: Dead or Alive", and "The Rifleman" were all among his credits. Another good film cameo came his way in The Magnificent Seven (1960), playing the railroad bully Wallace, who was quickly killed off by James Coburn in the famous gun v knife fight. He had a good role in Days of Heaven (1978) as Farmer Sam Shepard's ally, The Farm Foreman. Wilke was an expert golfer and, he was said by his friend Claude Akins to have "earned more money on the golf course than he ever did in movies".

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