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William Lee Scott

William Lee Scott

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Also Known As: William Scott Died:
Born: July 6, 1973 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession: actor, waiter

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A charismatic blue-eyed blond with a rough-hewn handsomeness and confident swagger that made him a perfect choice for rebellious "bad boy" roles, William Lee Scott proved more than just a one-note performer, capably handling parts from his sympathetic turn as the reckless but sincere Randy in "The Opposite of Sex" (1998) to the easily-led and disturbingly violent Will in "Black and White" (2000). After being discovered while working as a waiter in NYC and encouraged to put his magnetic good looks to use as a performer, the previously uninterested Scott hooked up with an acting coach and an agent. Soon he was a working actor and won the Best Actor Award from Columbia University in 1995 for his turn in the student film "'Tis the Season." In 1996, he marked his television debut with a regular role on The WB's high school-set sitcom "The Steve Harvey Show," playing a street tough in a classroom headed by an entertainer-turned-teacher played by the titular actor-comedian. While acting on the series, he took two 1997 guest roles on episodes of the grittier, short-lived ABC dramas "Gun" and "Cracker." That same year he appeared as the liberated eldest son of a troubled rural family in ABC's "Oprah Winfrey...

A charismatic blue-eyed blond with a rough-hewn handsomeness and confident swagger that made him a perfect choice for rebellious "bad boy" roles, William Lee Scott proved more than just a one-note performer, capably handling parts from his sympathetic turn as the reckless but sincere Randy in "The Opposite of Sex" (1998) to the easily-led and disturbingly violent Will in "Black and White" (2000). After being discovered while working as a waiter in NYC and encouraged to put his magnetic good looks to use as a performer, the previously uninterested Scott hooked up with an acting coach and an agent. Soon he was a working actor and won the Best Actor Award from Columbia University in 1995 for his turn in the student film "'Tis the Season." In 1996, he marked his television debut with a regular role on The WB's high school-set sitcom "The Steve Harvey Show," playing a street tough in a classroom headed by an entertainer-turned-teacher played by the titular actor-comedian. While acting on the series, he took two 1997 guest roles on episodes of the grittier, short-lived ABC dramas "Gun" and "Cracker." That same year he appeared as the liberated eldest son of a troubled rural family in ABC's "Oprah Winfrey Presents: Before Women Had Wings," the inaugural TV-movie produced by the superstar talk show host.

A small role in the film "Gattaca" (1997) marked the actor's feature debut, well-cast as the younger incarnation of Loren Dean's lawman character. Scott's enviable onscreen presence helped him make the most of smaller supporting roles, shining in his subsequent two big screen outings. He was featured in Don Roos' acclaimed "The Opposite of Sex," and the New York-raised actor did a fine job of recreating a decidedly Southern twang as Randy, the hometown boyfriend of manipulative DeDee (Christina Ricci). He continued his big screen ascent with a supporting role in the sleeper "October Sky" (1999). In this 1950s-set story based on NASA scientist Homer Hickman's autobiographical book "Rocket Boys," Scott played Roy Lee Cook, the physically abused resident charmer of a group of teenagers joined by their collective interest in space travel and their drive to break free of their oppressive small mining town life. While James Toback's "Black and White" proved a feature misfire, the improvisation-heavy performance offered the actor a unique challenge and a chance to showcase his developing talents with his role as a young man obsessed with black culture who ends up on the wrong side of the law although his estranged father is a Manhattan district attorney.

Scott's notoriously candid interviews and scathing comments about former co-workers from Oprah Winfrey to Claudia Schiffer certainly wouldn't land him a position as a diplomat and might have been expected to hurt his career, but following his incendiary statements, he managed to land sought-after roles in the anticipated Dominic Sena remake "Gone in 60 Seconds" (2000) and Michael Bay's World War II epic "Pearl Harbor" (lensed 2000) which promised to raise his profile considerably.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

2.
 Go-Getter, The (2007)
3.
4.
 Butterfly Effect, The (2004) Tommy Miller
5.
 Identity (2003)
7.
 Pearl Harbor (2001)
8.
10.
 October Sky (1999)
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Milestones close milestones

2004:
Appeared with Ashton Kutcher in the thriller "The Butterfly Effect"
1999:
Had supporting role in the 1957-set biopic "October Sky"
1997:
Made film debut with a cameo role as the younger incarnation of Loren Dean's character in the futuristic drama "Gattaca"
2001:
Signed to star opposite Ben Affleck and Josh Hartnett in the World War II actioner "Pearl Harbor"
1995:
Was awarded Best Actor Award from Columbia University for his performance in the student film "'Tis the Season"
2000:
Featured as a car thief in Dominic Sena's remake "Gone in 60 Seconds", starring Nicolas Cage and Angelina Jolie
:
Landed his debut acting role in a Kellogg's Frosted Flakes commercial on his first audition
1997:
Had guest roles on the short-lived ABC dramas "Cracker" and "Gun"
1996:
Played Bullethead, a likable tough in a group of underachiving misfits, in the high school-set sitcom "The Steve Harvey Show" (The WB)
1998:
Was featured in the acclaimed independent "The Opposite of Sex" as Christina Ricci's Christian boyfriend
2000:
Co-starred as the troubled son of a district attorney who is enamored of hip-hop culture in James Toback's largely improvised drama "Black and White"
:
Raised in Hudson, New York and in Manhattan
1997:
Was featured in the ABC TV-movie "Oprah Winfrey Presents: Before Women Had Wings" as the grown son of a troubled 1960s rural family
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Notes

Some of William Lee Scott's barbed commentary about co-workers on various projects, quoted in the New York Post, February 4, 1999: "['Black and White' co-star Claudia Schiffer] plays the girlfriend who kind of sleeps with everyone in the story. Which is ridiculous, because Claudia does not have the brains to actually figure out a way to sleep with that many people. She looked like she could barely get herself from here to the door, man. I'm just getting started. . .

"You could totally tell that [Oprah Winfrey, producer of Scott's first TV-movie outing] was just a completely two-faced woman. She was always switching. You don't want to get on her bad side."

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