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John Coe

John Coe

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George Coe was an American film and TV actor who appeared in several dozen roles over the course of a career spanning six decades. Having always had a desire to act, Coe received his formal acting training from Hofstra University and the American Academy of Dramatic Art. He started appearing in plays on Broadway in the late 1950s, before making the jump to film and TV in the early 1960s. In 1968, Coe was nominated for directing his comedic short, "De Düva: The Dove," which parodied the films of the iconic Swedish director, Ingmar Bergman. By the early 1970s, however, Coe put his budding directing career aside and turned to acting full-time. IN 1975 he became a part of the original cast of "Saturday Night Live" (NBC, 1975- ), but was quickly cut out of the show after appearing in the first three episodes. Undeterred, Coe continued landing supporting roles in various notable films over the next two decades, including "Kramer vs. Kramer" (1979), "Blind Date" (1987), and "The Mighty Ducks" (1992). By the dawn of the new millennium, Coe was nabbing parts on shows like "The West Wing" (NBC, 1999-2006), "Bones" (Fox, 2005- ), and "The King of Queens" (CBS, 1999-2007). Then in 2009, the 80-year-old Coe...

George Coe was an American film and TV actor who appeared in several dozen roles over the course of a career spanning six decades. Having always had a desire to act, Coe received his formal acting training from Hofstra University and the American Academy of Dramatic Art. He started appearing in plays on Broadway in the late 1950s, before making the jump to film and TV in the early 1960s. In 1968, Coe was nominated for directing his comedic short, "De Düva: The Dove," which parodied the films of the iconic Swedish director, Ingmar Bergman. By the early 1970s, however, Coe put his budding directing career aside and turned to acting full-time. IN 1975 he became a part of the original cast of "Saturday Night Live" (NBC, 1975- ), but was quickly cut out of the show after appearing in the first three episodes. Undeterred, Coe continued landing supporting roles in various notable films over the next two decades, including "Kramer vs. Kramer" (1979), "Blind Date" (1987), and "The Mighty Ducks" (1992). By the dawn of the new millennium, Coe was nabbing parts on shows like "The West Wing" (NBC, 1999-2006), "Bones" (Fox, 2005- ), and "The King of Queens" (CBS, 1999-2007). Then in 2009, the 80-year-old Coe started voicing the role of Woodhouse, devoted butler to selfish superspy Sterling Archer, on the FX animated series "Archer" (FX, 2009- ). Over the next few years, Coe lent his voice to the show while still continuing to nab small parts in movies and on TV, including another voice role in the horror-comedy, "13 Sins" (2014). George Coe died following a long illness on July 18, 2015. He was 86 years old.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
3.
 Me and My Brother (1969) Psychiatrist
4.
 Coogan's Bluff (1968) Bellboy
5.
 The Seducers (1962) Hank
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