skip navigation
Jack Del Rio

Jack Del Rio

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Recent DVDs

Columbia Pictures Film Noir... Sony Pictures Home Entertainment, the Film Foundation and Turner Classic Movies... more info $43.96was $49.99 Buy Now

Blonde Ice ... ICE in her veins... ICICLES on her heart! more info $5.95was $6.98 Buy Now

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Easily one of the most beautiful women of her era and one of the most gorgeous people ever to make it to the ranks of film stardom. Del Rio's career in the 1920s and 30s unfortunately suffered from too many exotic, two-dimensional roles designed with Hollywood's cliched ideas of ethnic minorities in mind. Her best-remembered film from this period is "Flying Down to Rio" (1933), which partnered Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers for the first time. One of her more interesting parts was her last American lead, in "Journey Into Fear" (1942), set up by and co-starring Del Rio's then paramour, Orson Welles. It took a return to the stage and screen in her native Mexico (where she won that country's equivalent of a Best Actress Oscar four times and was lauded as "the first lady of Mexican theater") and later Hollywood character parts (e.g., in John Ford's "The Fugitive" 1947 and his "Cheyenne Autumn" 1964) for her talent to be fully displayed.

Easily one of the most beautiful women of her era and one of the most gorgeous people ever to make it to the ranks of film stardom. Del Rio's career in the 1920s and 30s unfortunately suffered from too many exotic, two-dimensional roles designed with Hollywood's cliched ideas of ethnic minorities in mind. Her best-remembered film from this period is "Flying Down to Rio" (1933), which partnered Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers for the first time. One of her more interesting parts was her last American lead, in "Journey Into Fear" (1942), set up by and co-starring Del Rio's then paramour, Orson Welles. It took a return to the stage and screen in her native Mexico (where she won that country's equivalent of a Best Actress Oscar four times and was lauded as "the first lady of Mexican theater") and later Hollywood character parts (e.g., in John Ford's "The Fugitive" 1947 and his "Cheyenne Autumn" 1964) for her talent to be fully displayed.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Mister Cory (1957)
2.
3.
4.
 We're No Angels (1955) Gendarme
5.
 Border River (1954) Dealer
7.
8.
 Kansas City Confidential (1952) Mexican dealer
9.
 Quo Vadis (1951) Apostle
10.
 Between Midnight and Dawn (1950) Louis Franissi
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute