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Robert Dix

Robert Dix

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Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Richard Dix was an actor who had a successful Hollywood career. Richard Dix began his acting career appearing in various films, such as "Dangerous Curve Ahead" (1921), the Boardman Eleanor drama "Souls For Sale" (1923) and "The Ten Commandments" (1923). He also appeared in "The Vanishing American" (1925), "The Quarterback" (1926) and "Shanghai Bound" (1927). Richard Dix was nominated for an Actor Academy Award for "Cimarron" in 1931. He kept working in film throughout the thirties, starring in "The Lost Squadron" (1932), "The Great Jasper" (1933) and "Ace of Aces" (1933). He also appeared in "No Marriage Ties" (1933). Toward the end of his career, he tackled roles in "Man of Conquest" (1939), "Twelve Crowded Hours" (1939) and "Cherokee Strip" (1940). He also appeared in "The Round-Up" (1941) and "American Empire" (1942). Richard Dix was most recently credited in "The Trial of Standing Bear" (PBS, 1988-89). Richard Dix was married to Virginia Webster and had four children. Richard Dix passed away in September 1949 at the age of 56.

Richard Dix was an actor who had a successful Hollywood career. Richard Dix began his acting career appearing in various films, such as "Dangerous Curve Ahead" (1921), the Boardman Eleanor drama "Souls For Sale" (1923) and "The Ten Commandments" (1923). He also appeared in "The Vanishing American" (1925), "The Quarterback" (1926) and "Shanghai Bound" (1927). Richard Dix was nominated for an Actor Academy Award for "Cimarron" in 1931. He kept working in film throughout the thirties, starring in "The Lost Squadron" (1932), "The Great Jasper" (1933) and "Ace of Aces" (1933). He also appeared in "No Marriage Ties" (1933). Toward the end of his career, he tackled roles in "Man of Conquest" (1939), "Twelve Crowded Hours" (1939) and "Cherokee Strip" (1940). He also appeared in "The Round-Up" (1941) and "American Empire" (1942). Richard Dix was most recently credited in "The Trial of Standing Bear" (PBS, 1988-89). Richard Dix was married to Virginia Webster and had four children. Richard Dix passed away in September 1949 at the age of 56.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 The Red, White and Black (1970) Walking Horse
2.
 Cain's Way (1970) Gang leader
3.
 Horror of the Blood Monsters (1970) Colonel Manning
4.
 Hell's Bloody Devils (1970) Cunk
5.
 Rebel Rousers (1970)
6.
 Wild Wheels (1969) King
7.
 Five Bloody Graves (1969) Ben Thompson
8.
 Satan's Sadists (1969) Willie
9.
 Blood of Dracula's Castle (1969) Johnny
10.
 The Road Hustlers (1968) Mark Reedy
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Contributions

MEK ( 2009-03-11 )

Source: not available

When Bob and his twin brother did the play, "The Prince and the Pauper," at eleven years of age, he knew he wanted to be an actor like his famous father, Richard Dix. Born May 8, 1935, as a twin ten minutes younger than his brother Richard, Bob grew up in their hometown of Beverly Hills, California. Bob studied as an actor at the Nation Academy of Theater Arts at Pleasantville, New York the summer he was sixteen. The live stage appearances served as a solid foundation for his future as an actor. When he was eighteen years old and the studio signed him to a long-term contract. There he started with a few lines in some of the MGM's movies. The schooling and experience led to a featured roles. With the onset of Television, the contract player became part of Hollywood history. After two years with MGM, Bob was released from his contract and became a free lance actor. He worked in numerous movies for 20th Century Fox. His work included many of the popular TV shows like. His credits in the Independent Productions of Hollywood cover a long list which include his part as, "Hamilton," in 007's "Live and Let Die" , still a favorite. Roger Moore and Bob have been close friends since their early MGM days together. Visit Bob's website; www.RobertDix.com

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