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Al Dubin

Al Dubin

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Also Known As: Alexander Dubin Died: February 11, 1945
Born: June 10, 1891 Cause of Death: barbiturate poisoning
Birth Place: Switzerland Profession: lyricist, singing waiter

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Debuting onscreen as the bugle boy of Company "G" in the 1953 Oscar-winning classic "From Here to Eternity," Brooklyn-born actor Don Dubbins enjoyed a quick rise to A-list leading roles opposite Hollywood heavy hitters like James Cagney and Joseph Cotten. The flaxen-haired young performer was tapped by Cagney to be his costar in a pair of '56 features, the drama "These Wilder Years" and the Western "Tribute to a Bad Man," in which Dubbins played an honorable ranch hand who nevertheless falls for ranch boss Cagney's woman. The actor, who was often cast in military roles, next appeared in the boot-camp drama "The D.I." as a gutless Marine private driven relentlessly by his take-no-prisoners drill instructor, played by "Dragnet 1967" star Jack Webb, who also directed the picture. Webb's popular crime series provided just one of Dubbins's countless television guest-starring and supporting roles; he memorably appeared in the startling '60 "Elegy" episode of "Twilight Zone," as one of a trio of astronauts marooned on a strange still-life planet. Dubbins worked practically non-stop on television for the next three decades, interrupting his run of small-screen doctors and diplomats with only the rare feature...

Debuting onscreen as the bugle boy of Company "G" in the 1953 Oscar-winning classic "From Here to Eternity," Brooklyn-born actor Don Dubbins enjoyed a quick rise to A-list leading roles opposite Hollywood heavy hitters like James Cagney and Joseph Cotten. The flaxen-haired young performer was tapped by Cagney to be his costar in a pair of '56 features, the drama "These Wilder Years" and the Western "Tribute to a Bad Man," in which Dubbins played an honorable ranch hand who nevertheless falls for ranch boss Cagney's woman. The actor, who was often cast in military roles, next appeared in the boot-camp drama "The D.I." as a gutless Marine private driven relentlessly by his take-no-prisoners drill instructor, played by "Dragnet 1967" star Jack Webb, who also directed the picture. Webb's popular crime series provided just one of Dubbins's countless television guest-starring and supporting roles; he memorably appeared in the startling '60 "Elegy" episode of "Twilight Zone," as one of a trio of astronauts marooned on a strange still-life planet. Dubbins worked practically non-stop on television for the next three decades, interrupting his run of small-screen doctors and diplomats with only the rare feature portrayal, in films like the sci-fi adventure "From the Earth to the Moon" and the mind-bending Ray Bradbury adaptation "The Illustrated Man."

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Go into Your Dance (1935) Himself
2.
 A Very Honorable Guy (1934) Al
3.
 42nd Street (1933) Song writer
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1927:
First complete Broadway score, written in collaboration with composer Fred Coots, "White Lights"; ran for only 35 performances
1921:
First song interpolated into a Broadway production, "Sundown Brings Back Memories of You"; used in "Greenwich Village Follies of 1921"; also wrote special material for the show
1917:
Had first hit song, "All the World Will Be Jealous of Me" (music by Ernest R. Ball)
1937:
Received second Oscar nomination for the song "Remember Me?" from "Mr. Dodd Takes the Air"
1980:
Stage version of "42nd Street" (interpolating songs by Warren and Dubin) opened and won that year's Tony Award as Best Musical
1934:
With Warren, wrote the now classic song "I Only Have Eyes for You", used in "Dames"
1935:
Won Best Song Academy Award for "Lullaby of Broadway" from the film "Gold Diggers of 1935"
1917:
Served in US Army during WWI; was exposed to mustard gas and suffered permanent lung damage
1933:
Again teamed with Warren for both "Footlight Parade" and "Gold Diggers of 1933"
1933:
First collaboration with composer Harry Warren, the now classic backstage musical "42nd Street"
1940:
Put lyrics to an instrumental by Victor Herbert and enjoyed a hit song with "Indian Summer", recorded by Tommy Dorsey and Frank Sinatra
1943:
Received third Academy Award nomination for the song "We Mustn't Say Goodbye" (music by James Monaco) used in the film "Stage Door Canteen"
1911:
Teamed with composer Joe Burke; moved to NYC
1896:
Family moved from Switzerland to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
1909:
First two songs, "Prairie Rose" and "Sunray" published
1938:
Last collaborations with Warren, "Gold Diggers Go to Paris" and "Garden of the Moon"
1929:
Reunited with Joe Burke to write the songs (including "Tiptoe Through the Tulips") for the early Technicolor film "Gold Diggers of Broadway"
2001:
Revival of "42nd Street" produced on Broadway
1930:
With Burke, wrote songs for the films "She Couldn't Say No" and "Hold Everything"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Northeast M.T. High School: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania -
Perkiomen Seminary: Pennsburg, Pennsylvania -

Notes

He was posthumously inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1971.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Helen McClay. Showgirl. Roman Catholic; married on March 19, 1921; had stormy relationship as Dubin was a gambler and drinker; divorced.
wife:
Edwina Coolidge. Actor. Married on February 23, 1943; divorced several months later.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Simon Dubin. Gynecologist.
mother:
Minna Dubin. Chemist.
step-daughter:
Marie. From McClay's first marriage.
daughter:
Patricia Dubin. Born on November 26, 1922.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"The Art of Songwriting"
"Lullaby of Broadway: Life and Times of Al Dubin"

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