skip navigation
Alex Frazao

Alex Frazao

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Also Known As: Alexandre Frazao Died:
Born: Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession:

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Acclaimed playwright and novelist Michael Frayn initially rose to prominence in his British homeland writing satirical columns, first for Manchester Guardian and later for The Observer. His early books were compilations of his columns, but he soon graduated to autobiographical novels like "The Russian Interpreter" (1966) and "Toward the End of the Morning" (1967), the latter chronicling his days as a Fleet Street journalist. Though he had co-scripted "Zounds!" for the Cambridge University Footlights while a student, it had failed to move to the West End as expected, so his first professional production was "The Two of Us" (1970), four playlets performed by Richard Briers and Lynn Redgrave. Trained by the British Army to speak Russian, he has used his expertise most frequently to translate Chekhov's plays, beginning with the National Theatre's "The Cherry Orchard" (1977), followed by "Wild Honey" (1984), "The Three Sisters" (1985), "The Seagull" (1986) and "Uncle Vanya" (1987).After inaugurating his longstanding collaboration with director Michael Blakemore on "Make and Break" (1980), Frayn reteamed with Blakemore on the wonderful back-stage farce "Noises Off" (1982), called by Frank Rich, the former...

Acclaimed playwright and novelist Michael Frayn initially rose to prominence in his British homeland writing satirical columns, first for Manchester Guardian and later for The Observer. His early books were compilations of his columns, but he soon graduated to autobiographical novels like "The Russian Interpreter" (1966) and "Toward the End of the Morning" (1967), the latter chronicling his days as a Fleet Street journalist. Though he had co-scripted "Zounds!" for the Cambridge University Footlights while a student, it had failed to move to the West End as expected, so his first professional production was "The Two of Us" (1970), four playlets performed by Richard Briers and Lynn Redgrave. Trained by the British Army to speak Russian, he has used his expertise most frequently to translate Chekhov's plays, beginning with the National Theatre's "The Cherry Orchard" (1977), followed by "Wild Honey" (1984), "The Three Sisters" (1985), "The Seagull" (1986) and "Uncle Vanya" (1987).

After inaugurating his longstanding collaboration with director Michael Blakemore on "Make and Break" (1980), Frayn reteamed with Blakemore on the wonderful back-stage farce "Noises Off" (1982), called by Frank Rich, the former chief drama critic of The New York Times: "The single funniest play I ever saw on the job." Featuring a puerile play-within-a-play sex comedy entitled "Nothing On" and a cast of mediocre British actors on tour in the provinces, "Noises Off" sends up those calamitous (yet engaging) nights in the theater and the real-life illicit love triangles, paralleling those in "Nothing On," that can wreak havoc on a company. The wild romp earned Frayn his first Tony nomination, and he and Blakemore returned to Broadway in 1986 with "Benefactors," a much different kettle of fish which brought him a second Tony nod. A comedy only in the darkest sense, it confirmed the author's contention that "my works are about an ordered world breaking down into disorder." In "Benefactors," marriages and principles are the casualties when the idealized order of modern liberal society comes apart at the seems.

Undaunted by the failures of "Look, Look," which closed after only 27 London performances in 1990, and "Now You Know," which toured the United Kingdom but failed to make it to the West End, Frayn embarked on arguably his most cerebral play, "Copenhagen" (1998), doing for German physicist Werner Heisenberg's Principle what Tom Stoppard's "Arcadia" had done for Chaos Theory. "Copenhagen" investigates the unreliability of memory, the ambiguity of human motives and the conflicting loyalties of scientists in wartime by imagining what happened at the famous meeting in 1941 between Heisenberg, who was working for the Nazis at the time, and Neils Bohr, the half-Jewish Danish physicist who had mentored him before the war. Despite demanding an audience to sit up and pay attention, the play directed by Blakemore was a surprise hit in the West End and earned Frayn another Tony nomination when it debuted on Broadway with a completely different cast. Simultaneously, "Headlong," his clever novel about a man who thinks he has found a missing Brueghel in the home of an acquaintance and schemes to acquire it for himself, was short-listed for the prestigious Booker Prize.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute