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Dr. Kildare's Crisis

Dr. Kildare's Crisis(1940)

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  • NOT BAD MECICINE

    • BennyAnthony
    • 12/28/11

    In response to another review, INSANITY and MADNESS, to use the terms from that era, is possible with EPILEPSY, depending on what type of a person suffers from. For example, the following is a description of one form that is likely what was being diagnosed in the movie, as many diagnosticians utilized sympton by symptom diagnosis for the reason that even today some diseases defy a definitive blood-test to prove affliction, which examples are M.S., C.F.S. or fibromyalgia.{"Progressive myoclonic epilepsies define a group of symptomatic generalized epilepsies characterized by progressive DEMENTIA and myoclonic seizures. Tonic-clonic seizures may occur as well. Diseases usually classified in this group are Unverricht-Lundborg disease, myoclonus epilepsy with ragged red fibers (MERRF syndrome), Lafora disease, neuronal ceroid lipofucinosis, and sialdosis."}

  • Hindsight is 20/20

    • Vicky
    • 12/29/10

    These old movies are certainly dated with regard to the limited knowledge that was available at the time they were filmed. That said, most reasonably intelligent people would not find this a reason to consider these old movies "bad medicine" or negative in light of our current technology and 24/7 access to the most recent medical insights and advice. These movies are like an historical "snapshot" in a sense, and represent a time when medicine and medical knowledge were still very young and limited in scope. Without a doubt, the general public had very little medical knowledge... but again, these old movies are a reflection of those times. One would not expect them to "educate" the public, as so many of our movies and television specials have done in recent years, on a variety of timely and sensitive subjects.My father was an epileptic, and even in the 1960's when he was diagnosed, correct and updated information was available to patients and their families. These old movies are like time capsules and are a treasure trove for many of us, too young to have been alive in those days. Thanks for entertaining and letting us get a glimpse of the past, TCM!!

  • Bad medicine

    • Laura Kendall
    • 12/28/10

    As a person who has epilepsy, I found this movie to be unwatchable. This movie is based entirely on long-believed, but incorrect premises that epilepsy is inherited and can lead to mental illness. Many of the symptoms described in the film could be more readily attributed to schizophrenia or bi-polar disease, than to epilepsy. Dr. Kildare's performs an absurd "test" to determine if his future brother-in-law has epilepsy. The worst part is Mary Lamont's reaction to the diagnosis -- because the disease was supposedly hereditary, Mary gets hysterical when she finds out, and considers leaving her nursing job and canceling her marriage to Dr. Kildare. I cannot emphasize enough how this is the kind of ignorant thinking affected people who really had epilepsy. It caused people to avoid hiring anyone with epilepsy and many people did not want to marry into a family with a history of epilepsy.

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