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The Drowning Pool

The Drowning Pool(1975)

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  • The Browning Stool

    • Jeff Boston
    • 7/20/17

    When Newman and Woodward appear together onscreen, expect to hear an instrumental version of Flack's "Killing Me Softly with his Song." This flick was boring me safely and too long. However, it was cool seeing Robinson, who also played a freaky loser in the much better "Dirty Harry" and "Charlie Varrick" films, and Kallianiotes, who in "Five Easy Pieces" played so effectively one of the most bizarre, bewitching third-tier characters of all time. Truly memorable, unlike this stinker that should be flushed from any further primetime lineups, except for the part where the Mayor in "Jaws" says "You want to kiss and make up?" That was a hoot. Woodward and Griffith shoulda got the boot, their acting is so atrocious. They also deliver a dirty word (of course not as dirty now with our degenerating culture) in the singular and the plural so gratuitously here that each utterance inspires laughter and also the assumption that the censors had just permitted its inclusion in mainstream films. So, like so many 70's films, if it could be done, it would be done.

  • further proof...

    • don letta
    • 7/19/17

    ...that Melanie Griffith has been singularly annoying from the get-go.

  • 1st Class Thriller

    • Jim Smith
    • 7/18/17

    Well presented and paced with 1st class acting. Don't know why but Melanie Griffith has always 'owned' me. Sit back and enjoy.

  • No Movie Could Compete With Jaws

    • Robin
    • 8/2/16

    Just seeing this film now; but to recall, in 1975 I saw every movie released. So how did I miss this one? I did some checking and discovered Jaws was released one month earlier! No wonder! Bad timing. Jaws stayed the box office hit for a few months that summer. This movie wasn't all that great (in today's terms) but it's wasn't all that bad either. I love Paul Newman (majority of his movies; including Harper) and this had it's over-share of corn. In 2016 6hough, it was pretty cool seeing different manufacturer cars, disco shirts and men wearing whole pant-suits; and of course, this was pre-Katrina. It's worth a watch and I've watched it three times in two days. I am absorbing it. I recommend this film. (And by the way, the antagonist, Jay Hugh? Oil guy (The Graduate/Crawford's Hubby) is also Amityville's greedy mayor! He had two movies released in the summer of 1975.)

  • The Drowning Pool

    • michael whitty
    • 6/14/16

    Not a bad follow-up to "Harper" in which Paul Newman plays the L.A. detective sent to New Orleans to help a friend but finds almost more than he can handle. Lew Harper gets himself entangled with those of the law and others who scheme to take what is not theirs. In one scene Newman gets himself into a real drowning pool but is helped out at the last second. The 1970s provided some good detective films and this one worked out okay.

  • drowning pool

    • kevin sellers
    • 1/11/15

    About half as good as Harper. Biggest disappointment was that it didn't make better use of New Orleans. Give it a C.

  • The Drowning Pool (1975)

    • James Higgins
    • 12/26/09

    Good, but nothing extraordinary, and considering the cast, I would have expected more. It's well made, a little to slow in parts, but generally satisfying.

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