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Crime and Punishment

Crime and Punishment(1935)

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  • Repentance !

    • DON RILEY
    • 11/3/15

    In every script a director finds "The Spine" in this it is clearly portrayed. Its "repentance". And "oh how difficult, true repentance is". The final scene which is depicted as a religious revelation is extremely blunt but apt. Five Stars.

  • Such Greatness!

    • Raymond Banacki
    • 11/2/15

    "Crime and Puinishment" is a testament to the greatness of director Josef von Sternberg; his visualization of the story elements are consistently inventive and overwhelming.

  • crime and punishment

    • kevin sellers
    • 1/8/15

    Kinda slow, especially when Peter Lorre and Edward Arnold aren't together. When they are, however, the ol eyes are riveted. Also good is Mrs. Patrick Campbell (the name she went by on stage, in movies, and in life) as the pawnbroker. Apparently, she was an imperious monster in real life and on the set and this quality comes across in her performance. When Lorre whacks her you almost feel like cheering. Maybe that's not such a good thing, since it makes Lorre's guilt and remorse over killing her kind of unbelievable. It would have been better if she were more of an unpleasant cipher, like she was in the book. Give it a B minus.

  • Peter Lorre fascinates

    • Will Fox
    • 1/8/15

    Since first discovering Peter Lorre in TV's "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" and then in favorite films "Casablanca," "The Maltese Falcon," and "M" his charismatic persona intrigues, often beyond expectations. Case in point, "Crime and Punishment" features a delightful cat-and-mouse game with witty dialogue between Peter Lorre and Edward Arnold, as the wisely patient Porfiry, the detective. Plus a clear-thinking Christian converts the cynical criminal for the credible climax. Love prevails. Columbia Pictures, a studio from Hollywood's Poverty Row, produced this screen gem. Goes to show how necessity is the mother of invention. Thanks TCM. Now, when will you show Peter Lorre's last classic, "The Raven," from 1963? This funny, horror satire will be much appreciated by TCM's millions of movie mavens. So as you broadcast this, multiplying TCM Shop's ad-customers, please imagine our delight.

  • Please Play on TCM!

    • Kate
    • 8/17/14

    Watched this on another channel, with commercials. Would love to see it uninterrupted here on TCM.

  • Once Slimy, Always Slimy

    • GypsyPi3000
    • 5/11/13

    I have to admit, I really didn't like this movie. To be fair, I haven't read the book, but I imagine the book is better because it is able to nuance and use subtle details more effectively than film most of the time. That was one of the problems I had with the movie - it was too obvious. Arnold had the only character I really liked because I wasn't quite sure what he was up to most of the film. I also had difficulty seeing Lorre as anything other than a slimy creep. I couldn't believe Marsh would ever really fall in love with him, and when he asked her to wait for him while he was in prison, I laughed. The last scene tried the hardest to show the peace and righteousness descending upon Lorre's upturned faced, but even then, with the bright light glowing, I didn't buy it. Oh, and for some reason, I was mildly disappointed I didn't get to see that rock with the hollow under it again.

  • sublime

    • hermann
    • 1/4/11

    I loved this movie! Though I have not read the book, (I need to. I have read Brothers Karamazov.) this seemed like a real Dostoyevsky experience, with moral and religious concerns and a fascination fluctuation of attitudes and intents as the characters influence one another. (All in 90 minutes!) Peter Lorre was terrific. I also thought the actress playing Sonya (Marian Marsh) was very effective. The film is full of really wonderful visual elements. (Thank you Josef von Sternberg.) I was engrossed throughout, and later on even quietly thrilled, elevated, by this movie.

  • Edward Arnold, the dependable actor

    • Jeff Boston
    • 1/4/11

    I watched Peter Lorre and Edward Arnold in "Crime and Punishment" last night. Very low budget adaptation of the universally acclaimed novel with the eternal message we all have witnessed being played out much too often. I liked how the adaptation rightly includes, especially when considering the story, several references to God. The references today's Hollywood makes to God and the Christian religion are overwhelmingly, and wrongly, contemptuous and/or mocking. I have seen Arnold in a few other films (Mr. Smith Goes to Washington; The Devil and Daniel Webster; Meet John Doe) and have always enjoyed him. He was a fine actor. Peter Lorre reminded me of Napoleon, one of his character's idols in this work. I now see him as something more than Igor or the slimy characters from "Casablanca" and "The Maltese Falcon." Prior to making American films, he was a smash in Europe. I can see why, although he would never make it today, in my opinion. One scene I really liked was the one that ended with the student-turned-writer explaining to the inspector why he called him a professor.

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