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Blonde Venus

Blonde Venus(1932)

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  • blonde venus

    • kevin sellers
    • 5/24/18

    Veering from hard edged to mushy, realistic to melodramatic, this is a most uneven film. There are extended sequences of real power, such as the whole movie within a movie that is Dietrich and her young son's sojourn through the lower depths of the American deep South in the early 30s, alternating with hokey stuff involving long suffering hubby Herbert Marshall, (at best a merely serviceable actor who inexplicably kept getting dull roles like this one). Throughout, one gets the sense that director Josef Von Sternberg has been taken out of his lush, decadent, exotic comfort zones (i.e. Morocco, Catherine The Great's court, China, etc) and forced to work in the uncongenial climate of what to him is undoubtedly the more prosaic American scene. The result is a film that, by comparison with say "Blue Angel" and "Scarlet Empress", is both flatter and more ordinary. And that sense of the commonplace extends to the director's frequent scenarist Jules Furthman, as well. Even the songs Dietrich sings are unmemorable, unlike the ones in "Morocco" or "Blue Angel." As far as the acting goes, with the exception of Marhsall it's good. Dietrich acquits herself well, and there is a fair amount of heat generated between her and Cary Grant. Also, Hattie Mc Daniel and Sidney Toler are memorable in that great Southern sequence. And the kid actor is not too cloying. Give it a B minus.

  • the films and the viewership.

    • a.morris
    • 5/5/18

    sometimes..when a person has an urge..it might make them feel something within them ..a type of feeling ..they have never felt before.it is not something to be confused about. it just means ..you want a story..and you want that story to be ..a film story. do not be ashamed.. most people will tell you ..it is natural to watch a movie. it is a product of human behavior called..wanting to be entertained.the following presentation ..will help you to better understand ..this strange desire called..film criticism. if the main being called..the star makes you have strange feelings inside you..that is none of my businesss.. talk to your parents. if over the age of 50..talk to bill nye the science guy.

  • Indecent Proposal

    • Christa
    • 12/6/13

    Am I the only one who believes that the 90's Movie " Indecent Proposal" with Demi Moore and Robert Redford borrowed heavily from Blonde Venus?

  • Blonde Venus (1932)

    • James Higgins
    • 2/19/10

    Beautifully photographed, excellent story. Marlene Dietrich is magnificent, she expresses so much in her face, a wonderful actress. Good supporting cast. Herbart Marshall, Hattie McDaniel and Sidney Toler are all exceptional. Wonderful production, excellent pacing.

  • Showgirl makes good mother. - Who knew?

    • DougieB
    • 3/17/09

    Did you read the synopsis? Pretty cornball, right? Don't let it stop you from catching this classic tearjerker. Even with a surprisingly stiff Cary Grant to contend with, Dietrich is sublime. Though her visual style is anything but understated, her acting style is spare and compelling, and her moments alone with her son, Dickie Moore, are among the finest here. There are some departures from the formula, notably her "Hot Voodoo" nightclub number. This movie had a kind of cult status in revival houses back in the 1970's and, inevitably, when her bejewelled hand would emerge from her ape suit costume, the audience went wild. You really have to remind yourself that it was made in 1932, because it's so well-edited and has such a sheen to it. It's definitely one for the ages.

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