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Topaz

Topaz(1969)

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Topaz A French agent is sent to Cuba... MORE > $13.97 Regularly $19.98 Buy Now blu-ray

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  • topaz

    • kevin sellers
    • 12/30/17

    May not be Hitch's worst ("Under Capricorn," anyone?) but it's still trending downward. It looks like this film was designed to make Frederic Stafford into a French Sean Connery, but at best he comes across as a Gallic Craig Stevens. His two female co stars are even worse. Dany Robin makes Tippi Hedren look like Joanne Woodward while Karin Dor is even more egregiously bad than Dany Robin. (By the way, I've had to suffer this attractive lox TWICE tonight, with this dog and "Follow The Boys," which is such a piece of dreck I didn't even bother to review it!) Because it is a Hitchcock film there is a memorable sequence or two, such as the secret photostats of the Cuban revolutionaries taken in the Harlem hotel and featuring that great 60s/70s suave, erudite character actor, Roscoe Lee Browne. And John Forsythe is properly dry and laconic as a veteran CIA operative. But all in all this is an overlong, not very tense film that will keep the fast forward on your remote very busy. Solid C. P.S. In what is undoubtedly Hitch's least classy or inventive cameo in one of his films he seeks to amuse us with a wheelchair joke. Kinda sums up this movie for me.

  • polish the stone..it will shine once more.

    • a.morris
    • 12/24/17

    far from his best. still better than some younger.. art house directors. he would rebound before all said and done in the 1970s.

  • Dreadfully dull movie.

    • Steve
    • 7/15/17

    The pacing in this film is glacier slow. You wonder what people where thinking. Just not much to see here. One of Hitchcock's worst.

  • Beautifully made Hitch spy movie.

    • sigerson
    • 7/10/15

    Vastly under-rated .

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